Yinimala Gumana | Dhaḻwaŋu Clan Designs

Yinimala Gumana

Dhaḻwaŋu Clan Designs, 2019

Dhaḻwaŋu Miny’tji

Clan

Dhaḻwaŋu

Clan

Barama and Lany’tjung

"This painting is very important to our Yolŋu people of the Yirritja moiety, and particularly to my Dhalwaŋu clan. It is about Gäṉgäṉ, a central place for the Yirritja clans, where Barama lived. You can see Barama at the top, the central creator, thinking our Country into being, distributing different sacred objects, Law and ownership to the Yirritja clans. Barama was living in Gäṉgän, and that is how we maintain the Law that he passed on to our ancestors, through our forefathers, for generation after generation. We carry on this legacy of the leadership that Barama laid down in our Country. And down the bottom, you can see minhala, the long necked turtle. It is an important animal that we sing. It holds a story that has been sung for thousands of years by my people. And then there is gany'tjurr, the heron, looking down to the Gäṉgän waterhole. And you can see the two lightning snakes, burrut’ji, meeting each other, their tongues coming together and communicating to each other, as well as to others across Arnhem Land. All these patterns are connected to the land and contain deep meanings. The patterns have stories and songlines, and Djirrikay and Dalkarra, which are different forms of diplomacy and different ways of telling the stories. Very deep knowledge from the Dalkarra. We sing through the manikay and we sing through the Dalkarra. So that is the story of this bark painting. It is a story painted by the old people, and today I put it forward to show the way that we can pass this story on, sending it all around the world. So today, I pass on this story, it is a story that is special to me and my family, but also to other clans. For while the Dhuwa have Djan’kawu, the Yirritja have Barama. It is a different story, a different meaning, and a different ownership."

– Yinimala Gumana

More Info


Additional Information

Decade

2019

Medium

Natural pigments on eucalyptus bark

Dimensions (IN)

101 3/16 x 33 15/32 x 4 5/16

Dimensions (CM)

257 x 85 x 11

Credit

Forthcoming acquisition. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia. The 2017-19 Kluge-Ruhe Maḏayin Commission.

Clan

Dhaḻwaŋu

The Dhaḻwaŋu clan’s main homeland is at Gäṉgaṉ, a freshwater area that consists of rivers,...

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Narrative

Barama and Lany’tjung

There were three ancestral beings: Barama, Lany’tjun and Galparrimun. Barama came from the place called...

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Location

Gäṉgaṉ

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Location

Baraltja

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Location

2010

At Yirrkala, Ishmael Marika was appointed creative director of the Mulka Project in 2010. Alicia...

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About The Artist

Clan

Dates

Born 1982

Alternative Names

Yinimala Gumana

Yinimala Gumana is an important young leader of the Dhaḻwaŋu clan. The son of Dhäkuwal Gumana, Yinimala was raised by his father’s brother, Gawirriṉ Gumana, after Dhäkuwal’s death. Yinimala assisted his adopted father with many of his works before emerging as an artist in his own right in 2004. In 2011 he was elected Chairperson of Buku-Larrnggay Mulka. Since 2017, he has been one of the lead curators of Maḏayin: Eight Deacades of Aboriginal Australian Bark Painting from Yirrkala.

Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth

Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia

Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory

Pieces By Decade

2010

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