Dhukaḻ Wirrpanda | Events at Dhuruputjpi

Dhukaḻ Wirrpanda

Events at Dhuruputjpi, 1996

Dhuruputjpi Dhäwu

Clan

Dhuḏi-Djapu

Clan

Mäna

""

More Info

This painting narrates a series of ancestral events connected to the Djan’kawu (Dhuwa creator beings) and Bulmanydji the shark. These events happened under the rays of the sun during the first morning. Freshwater sprang from the holes created by the Djan’kawu sisters, who are represented by the ancestral goanna. The black soil plain at Dhurruputjpi is dotted with these wells and walked on by hundreds of ancestral Brolga. The permanent waters of this area are covered with the leaves of the wild banana (Daraŋgi). This plant also covers the entrance to Bulmanydji’s domain in the freshwaters of Dhurruputjpi. Miny’tji (sacred clan designs) for the Dhudi-Djapu are represented by the freshwaters welling from the ground, the rays of the first sun, and the Daraŋgi floating on the surface of the permanent waters. Two icons of power are also depicted in the painting.


– Buku-Larrŋgay Mulka Centre

Additional Information

Decade

1996

Medium

Natural pigments on eucalyptus bark

Dimensions (IN)

116 x 47 1/4

Dimensions (CM)

294.6 x 120

Credit

Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia. Gift of John W. Kluge, 1997. 1996.0035.015

Clan

Dhuḏi-Djapu

The Dhuḏi-Djapu clan are part of the Dhuwa moiety. Their homeland is Dhuruputjpi, a settlement...

View All Artworks >

Narrative

Mäna

In Yolŋu oral tradition, several Dhuwa clans are connected by the journey of Mäṉa (the...

View All Artworks >

Location

Dhuruputjpi

View All Artworks >

Location

1990

Due to innovations in technology, communication was expedited in the 1990s. For example, Buku-Larrŋgay received...

View All Artworks >

About The Artist

Clan

Dates

Born 1957

Alternative Names

Dhukaḻ Wirrpanda

Dhukaḻ Wirrpanda is an important political leader of the Dhuḏi-Djapu’ clan. Although not a prolific artist, he has painted consistently since the mid-1980s and often provided both cultural advice and practical assistance to his wife, Galuma Maymuru, on her paintings.